Category: Edtech

London Edtech Week and EdTechXEurope

Matt Johnson

Next week is London Edtech Week featuring 30+ events for the local and global edtech community, including Cooley sponsored Live Podcast: Is Edtech a Thing (Yet)? EdTechXEurope takes place next Wednesday with 125+ speakers and 850+ global attendees.

Cooley Team at ASU GSV Summit 2017

Jay Vaughan, Erik Edwards, Mike Goldstein, Greg Ferenbach, Kate Lee Carey and Matt Johnson

The 2017 ASU GSV Summit is Monday, May 8-10 in Salt Lake City. The ASU GSV Summit is THE conference for edtech companies and investors. The Cooley team is ready to go and we hope to see you there!

Avoiding Common Legal Issues at Coding Schools (and Other Edtech Companies): Accessibility and the Americans with Disabilities Act

Nancy Anderson, Paul Thompson and Mike Goldstein

If you operate a coding academy or provide almost any kind of educational program (whether face-to-face, online or hybrid) – regardless of whether you accept federal funds or participate in federal student aid programs – you are probably required to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Avoiding Common Legal Issues at Coding Schools: Data Privacy and Security

Matthew Johnson

The second post in the series on common legal and regulatory pitfalls that alternative education providers must proactively avoid focuses on data privacy and security. Learn more about student data privacy and best practices and policies.

Avoiding Common Legal Issues at Coding Schools: Marketing

Greg Ferenbach and Paul Thompson

This is the first of a series of posts on common legal and regulatory pitfalls that alternative education providers must proactively avoid. Today’s topic is avoiding sloppy or overly aggressive marketing.

Excitement about Adult Learning: A Lasting Impression from SXSWedu

Matt Johnson

Cooley associate, Matt Johnson, attended SXSWedu last week. Read his insights on the conference and key takeaway for 2017.

Starting A Coding School? Do Your Homework!

Greg Ferenbach

So-called “coding boot camps” are a hot business idea these days. Companies that provide courses on coding serve an important social need, giving people the tools they need to get jobs in the digital economy. The programs vary greatly in duration and cost, and some use creative pricing models, like taking a cut of the student’s salary at their next job in lieu of upfront tuition.

The Top Five Legal Issues for Edtech Startups and Schools

Matt Johnson

As an attorney who focuses on legal issues relevant to the education sector, I’m often asked about some of the key legal issues in the space—especially for emerging companies who have to be strategic about allocating their time and resources.

Common Sense Media to Grade EdTech Company Privacy Practices

Matt Johnson, Danielle Naftulin and Jay Vaughan

Last week, Common Sense Media (CSM) announced that it is undertaking an ambitious initiative to evaluate and grade the student data privacy practices of EdTech companies that provide products, apps, or services for use in K-12 classrooms.

FTC Focuses on Lead Generation Practices in Higher Education and Edtech

Jacqueline Grise, Scott Dailard, Greg Ferenbach, Tanisha James and Paul Thompson

On Friday, October 30, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission conducted a workshop in Washington, DC on lead generation practices, with a specific consumer protection focus on activities in the higher education sector including ed tech companies.

DOJ Puts Pressure on Schools and Edtechs to Provide Accessible Educational Technology

Mike Goldstein, Paul Thompson and Nancy Anderson

In our last alert on the growing interaction between edtech and disability law, we noted that the Department of Justice (DOJ) appears to be moving to extend the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to reach entities other than schools that provide online educational programs and services.

Websites as Places of Public Accommodation: DOJ Settlement May Extend Accessibility Requirements to Virtual Space

Mike Goldstein, Paul Thompson and Nancy Anderson

Recent headlines around a high-profile settlement between the US Department of Justice and edX, Inc., one of the largest and earliest distributors of MOOCs, have once again highlighted the importance of understanding the rules for making online courses and services accessible to those with various types and levels of disabilities.